adjective


adjective
ad•jec•tive
[[t]ˈædʒ ɪk tɪv[/t]] n.
1) gram. a member of a class of words functioning as modifiers of nouns, typically by describing, delimiting, or specifying quantity, as nice in a nice day, other in other people, or all in all dogs, and in many languages distinguished by formal characteristics, as often in English by the ability to be used in comparative and superlative forms
Abbr.: adj. 1)
2) gram. of, pertaining to, or functioning as an adjective; adjectival:
an adjective phrase[/ex]
3) not able to stand alone; dependent
4) law Law. pertaining to rules of procedure, rather than those of right
(opposed to substantive).
5) tex (of dye colors) requiring a mordant or the like to render them permanent
(opposed to substantive).
Etymology: 1350–1400; ME < LL adjectīvum, neut. of adjectīvus= L adject(us), ptp. of ad(j)icere to attach, add (ad- ad- +-(j)icere, comb. form of jacere to throw) +-īvus -ive ad′jec•tive•ly, adv.

From formal English to slang. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • adjective — 1. general. The term adjective was itself an adjective for a hundred years before it became used as a noun for one of the parts of speech. Joseph Priestley, in The Rudiments of English Grammar (1761), was perhaps the first English grammarian to… …   Modern English usage

  • Adjective — Ad jec*tive, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Adjectived}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Adjectiving}.] To make an adjective of; to form or change into an adjective. [R.] [1913 Webster] Language has as much occasion to adjective the distinct signification of the verb,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Adjective — Ad jec*tive ([a^]d j[e^]k*t[i^]v), a. [See {Adjective}, n.] [1913 Webster] 1. Added to a substantive as an attribute; of the nature of an adjunct; as, an adjective word or sentence. [1913 Webster] 2. Not standing by itself; dependent. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adjective — late 14c., as an adjective, adjectival, in noun adjective, from O.Fr. adjectif (14c.), from L. adjectivum that is added to (the noun), neut. of adjectivus added, from pp. of adicere to throw or place (a thing) near, from ad to (see AD (Cf. ad ))… …   Etymology dictionary

  • adjective — [aj′ik tiv] n. [ME & OFr adjectif < L adjectivus, that is added < adjectus, pp. of adjicere, to add to < ad , to + jacere, to throw: see JET1] any of a class of words used to modify a noun or other substantive, as by describing qualities …   English World dictionary

  • Adjective — Ad jec*tive, n. [L. adjectivum (sc. nomen), neut. of adjectivus that is added, fr. adjicere: cf. F. adjectif. See {Adject}.] 1. (Gram.) A word used with a noun, or substantive, to express a quality of the thing named, or something attributed to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adjective — ► NOUN Grammar ▪ a word used to describe or modify a noun, such as sweet, red, or technical. DERIVATIVES adjectival adjective. ORIGIN Old French adjectif, from Latin adicere add …   English terms dictionary

  • adjective — index procedural Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • adjective — [n] word that modifies a noun accessory, additional, adjunct, adnoun, attribute, attributive, dependent, descriptive, identifier, modifier, qualifier; concept 275 …   New thesaurus

  • Adjective — Examples That s an interesting idea. (attributive) That idea is interesting. (predicative) Tell me something interesting. (postpositive) The good, the bad, and the ugly. (substantive) In grammar, an adjective is a describing word; the main… …   Wikipedia

  • adjective — /ˈædʒəktɪv / (say ajuhktiv) noun 1. Grammar a. one of the major word classes in many languages, comprising words that typically modify a noun. b. such a word, as wise in a wise ruler, or in she is wise. –adjective 2. Grammar relating to an… …   Australian English dictionary